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A new study shows Starbucks new logo may create more Asian expansion

First it was China, then India, now Japan? I was kidding a few months ago when I said Starbucks is going to take over the world and darn it if they aren’t. And there is only one person to...
 Starbucks expands in Asian market
 
 

First it was China, then India, now Japan? I was kidding a few months ago when I said Starbucks is going to take over the world and darn it if they aren’t. And there is only one person to blame: the mermaid.

Remember last week when I reported that Starbucks is going to scrap the Company name from the coffee cups and stamp it with its iconic mermaid? Well now studies have been done to demonstrate how this strategy could possibly advance the Company’s success in achieving even more business in the Asian market.

Fast Company reported that, “Professors of marketing at several U.S. universities have been studying the effects of redesign--and on certain types of redesign--on committed and non-committed customers, and what they've found suggests that Starbucks might succeed where Gap and Tropicana failed.

“The researchers have recently conducted two studies, the first of which was published last year, the second of which is forthcoming this spring. The first study, from Michael Walsh of West Virginia University, Karen Winterich of Texas A&M, and Vikas Mittal of Rice University, asked broadly: "Do logo designs help or hurt your brand?" Both--and neither--was the answer. In short, it depends who you want to attract.”

One of the studies looked at a very specific graphic design choice: the shift from a more angular logo to one with softer, rounder shapes. The study finds that this particular redesign is, "more acceptable in interdependent and collectivist cultures--often found in Asian countries, such as India and China--than in Western countries, which tend to have a more independent or individualistic culture." Mittal stated: "Research in aesthetics shows that interdependent cultures prefer rounded shapes as they represent harmony, which is consistent with an interdependent view of the world ... Those countries tend to have a higher percentage of rounded logos compared with individualistic countries, and logos and product shapes that are rounded are more acceptable and embraced in those cultures."

Mittal's conclusion suggests that Starbucks, with its intentions to expand its presence in Asia, may have made a very intelligent move with that market in mind. Not only does removing the name of the brand from the logo disassociate it from the English speaking world, but by focusing in solely on the mermaid figure in the center of the original logo, the new one is definitely rounder in shape. If Mittal and his colleagues' assessment is well received, the Starbucks redesign might just be brilliant enough to win over the Asian markets, advocates for harmony.

News Source: Fast Company



 



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