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Microbreweries go green by canning glass and switching to metal

Thanks to the notion of sustainability, microbreweries are thinking about taking a less classy approach by allowing their boozers to go from drinking out of glass bottles to metal containers, a euphemism for cans, or maybe that should be the other way around.
 Microbreweries choose cans over bottles
 
 

Thanks to the notion of sustainability, microbreweries are thinking about taking a less classy approach by allowing their boozers to go from drinking out of glass bottles to metal containers, a euphemism for cans, or maybe that should be the other way around.

A company in Maine called Baxter Brewing has joined a growing number of small craft-beer breweries distributing their brews in cans rather than in bottles. This was unheard of ten years ago as U.S. craft breweries wouldn’t be caught dead canning their suds. What a difference a decade makes. Now nearly 100 sell at least one beer variety in metal.

Luke Livingston, founder and president of Baxter Brewing said cans are good for the beer, the environment and consumers, because they're easy to take on camping trips and golf outings. When Livingston decided to open a small brewery sans bottles, some people protested and said they would never drink draft beer from a can.
"My retort to those people is that draft beer comes out of a keg," Livingston said. "And what's a keg? A keg's just a big can, it's a big metal container."

As the craft beer industry took off in the 1990s, small local and regional breweries distributed their ales, bocks, stouts and other varieties in bottles.

While craft beer has been sold predominantly in bottles, cans have been associated with mainstream beers such as Budweiser, Coors and Pabst Blue Ribbon.

Livingston also argues that cans improve the quality of the beer because it isn't tainted by light and is exposed to less oxygen than bottled varieties. They're also more conducive for the environment because cans take less fuel to ship because they are lighter than bottles. Consumers are also twice as likely to recycle cans as bottles.

This green idea really has the world in its grip. Don’t the rest of us have a say in this? Apparently not so don’t even try. Because when it comes down to what consumers want and what’s best for Mother Earth, she’s going to win every time.

News Source: Yahoo! News



 



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